DCF Valuation Course Case Study

We like to highlight certain cases where Intrinio Financial Data makes a huge difference for our users.

This semester, students in the University of South Florida's Intro to Finance course used the Intrinio Excel add-in to help them understand DCF Valuation.

Valuation:

The process of determining the current worth of an asset or company. There are many techniques that can be used to determine value, some are subjective and others are objective.

For example, an analyst valuing a company may look at the company's management, the composition of its capital structure, prospect of future earnings, and market value of assets.

Judging the contributions of a company's management would be more of a subjective valuation technique, while calculating intrinsic value based on future earnings would be an objective technique.

For our class with USF, we used the objective approach. We helped the students use Intrinio data to construct a Discounted Cash Flow Model (DCF) in order to determine the intrinsic value of a company.

Like most parts of financial analysis, the hardest part about a DCF valuation is gathering the data necessary to build the model. Without the use of innovative tools like the Intrinio Financial Data Feed, students (and professionals) can be left spending (wasting) hours entering the data before they can actually analyze it and build their model.

Scroll to the end of this Case Study and take a peek at the last image - the finished Discounted Cash Flow model. Can you imagine how long this would take if you needed to type it all in by hand? Hours.

Instead, using the Intrinio Excel add-in, the students at USF were able to quickly build a dynamic model that saves them time moving forward. If they want to value a new company - they simply change the ticker. Without the Intrinio Excel add-in, they'd need to type each new value in by hand.

It is estimated that Intrinio saved each student at University of South Florida an average of 10 hours of data entry during their studies of Valuation.

Aside from learning the valuable skills of Valuation (pun intended) the students at USF gained an advanced understanding of Excel modeling and learned tips, tricks and shortcuts for getting the most out of the functionality of Excel - very important skills for a future in the business world.

Installation

The class began by quickly installing the Intrinio Excel add-in on each student's own personal computer (Mac OS X & Microsoft Windows). The entire install process took less than 5 minutes, and the students followed along with the directions and YouTube video on the Intrinio channel.

Installation link: https://home.intrinio.com/getting-started-excel-step-1/

Excel

Once the Excel add-in was installed on each student's computer, we walked them through the process of building a DCF step by step.

Setup

Begin by naming your first Sheet in Excel "DCF" (discounted cash flow), and naming a second sheet "WACC" (weighted average cost of capital).

Choose a ticker and enter it in cell A1 - so that it can be referenced throughout the entire model. In our example, we use AAPL (Apple).

Click on the A1 Cell, then click on the named range box just above it. Delete "A1" and type the word "ticker". Now, in each of your formulas you'll be able to simply type "ticker" instead of "AAPL" or "A1".

Note: Some of your data will look different from the data in this Case Study because it will be more current - the data in the following screenshots and examples is how it looked for the USF students the day they built their DCF.

Cash Flow Model

Skipping a couple of lines, enter in each item that we will pull in data for and forecast for AAPL in cells B7-B19.

In the next column, next to the actual values (Total Revenues) but not the ratios/percentages (% Revenue Growth), put the associated "Intrinio Tag" that we'll use to pull the data in. This will make building our formulas much easier.

  • totalrevenue
  • ebit
  • capex
  • depreciationandamortization
  • nwc

So far, your DCF workbook should look something like this:

Intrinio DCF Valuation Case Study Y Axis

Historical & Projected Fiscal Years

For this case, we're going to be pulling in historical data dating back to 2009, and forecasting out two years to 2017. We use something called a "sequence" number in our data feed, which represents the "nth" item in a data series. Since we're going back 6 years (2015 is sequence number 0), we'll need 6 items in the sequence.

In cell J2 type "0", then in cell I2 type "J2+1", then drag across to cell "D2".

You should have populated 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 0 across row 2.

Intrinio DCF Valuation Case Study Periods

Next, underneath each of these sequence numbers in row 3, we'll want to populate the corresponding end-dates for the income statement (the data we're pulling in).

In cell J3 type the following formula to pull this data in:

=IntrinioFundamentals(ticker,"income_statement","FY",J2,"end_date")

It should populate with: 2015-09-26

You can drag this across to sequence number 6 in D3 and the whole row should populate.

By using formulas like this to pull in seemingly simple numbers, we are making the model extremely dynamic and flexible. It may seem simpler to type out 2015-09-26 -> but in fact you'll be creating a dynamic model and saving time by using the formulas to pull this data in.

 

Next, underneath these dates in row 4, we'll want to populate the fiscal year associated with the historical dates and statements (2009-2015).

In cell J4 type the following formula to pull this data in:

=IntrinioFundamentals(ticker,"income_statement","FY",J2,"fiscal_year")

It should populate with: 2015

You can drag this across to column D, and the whole row should populate with the correct fiscal years corresponding to the sequence number.

Intrinio DCF Valuation Case Study Years

Lastly, underneath this we'll want to pull in the fiscal period for each cell (this is just FY, indicating that these are fiscal year values, as opposed to quarterly, etc.).

In cell J5, type the following formula to pull these fiscal periods in:

=IntrinioFundamentals(ticker,"income_statement","FY",H2,"fiscal_period")

It should populate with: FY

You can drag this across to column D, and the whole row should populate with the correct fiscal periods.

 

Back up in row 1, merge and center the cells from D1 to J1, and type in "Historical" to indicate that these columns will have historical data.

Merge and center cells K1 and L1, and type in "Forecasted" to indicate that these columns will have forecasted data.

 

We want our first forecasted date to be next year on the same month, same day.

In cell K3, type the following formula to pull this date in:

=DATE(YEAR(J3)+1,MONTH(J3),DAY(J3))

It should populate with: 09/26/2016

You can drag this cell over one into L3 to populate the following year.

 

Underneath this, we want to pull in the associated years (2016 and 2017).

In cell K4, type the following formula in:

=+J4+1

It should populate with: 2016

You can drag this cell over one into L4 to populate the following year.

So far, your DCF workbook should look something like this:

Intrinio DCF Valuation Case Study X-axis

Historical Data

Next we're going to populate the raw historical data from 2009 - 2015. Using Intrinio formulas we'll pull in all the historical data for Revenues, EBIT, CAPEX, Depreciation and Net Working Capital.

In cell D7, type the following formula to pull in AAPL's total revenues for FY 2009:

=IntrinioFinancials(ticker,"income_statement",D4,D5,$C$7,"M")

You're referencing the ticker, "2009" (D4), "FY" (D5), as well as the associated tag "totalrevenue" ($C$7).

$C$7 is being hard coded ($) so that when we drag the formulas it doesn't auto-populate. This value will change.

"M" stands for millions. You can return values in "A" (actuals), "K" (thousands), "M" (millions) or "B" (billions).

If we were writing the whole formula out by hand, it would look like this:

=IntrinioFinancials("AAPL","income_statement",2009,"FY","totalrevenue","M")

You can click and drag this cell across all the way to J7 and you should see the associated revenue values populate.

 

In cell D9, type the following formula to pull in AAPL's EBIT for FY 2009:

=IntrinioFinancials(ticker,"calculations",D4,D5,$C$9,"M")

You're referencing the ticker, "2009" (D4), "FY" (D5), as well as the associated tag "ebit" ($C$9).

If we were writing the whole formula out by hand, it would look like this:

=IntrinioFinancials("AAPL","calculations",2009,"FY","ebit","M")

You can click and drag this cell across all the way to J9 and you should see the associated EBIT values populate.

 

In cell D11, type the following formula to pull in AAPL's CAPEX for FY 2009:

=IntrinioFinancials(ticker,"calculations",D4,D5,$C$11,"M")

You're referencing the ticker, "2009" (D4), "FY" (D5), as well as the associated tag "capex" ($C$11).

If we were writing the whole formula out by hand, it would look like this:

=IntrinioFinancials("AAPL","calculations",2009,"FY","capex","M")

You can click and drag this cell across all the way to J11 and you should see the associated CAPEX values populate.

In cell D13, type the following formula to pull in AAPL's Depreciation for FY 2009:

=IntrinioFinancials(ticker,"calculations",D4,D5,$C$13,"M")

You're referencing the ticker, "2009" (D4), "FY" (D5), as well as the associated tag "depreciationandamortization" ($C$13).

If we were writing the whole formula out by hand, it would look like this:

=IntrinioFinancials("AAPL","calculations",2009,"FY","depreciationandamortization","M")

You can click and drag this cell across all the way to J13 and you should see the associated capex values populate.

 

In cell D15, type the following formula to pull in AAPL's NWC for FY 2009:

=IntrinioFinancials(ticker,"calculations",D4,D5,$C$15,"M")

You're referencing the ticker, "2009" (D4), "FY" (D5), as well as the associated tag "nwc" ($C$15).

If we were writing the whole formula out by hand, it would look like this:

=IntrinioFinancials("AAPL","calculations",2009,"FY","nwc","M")

You can click and drag this cell across all the way to J15 and you should see the associated capex values populate.

Historical Ratios

Next we'll want to use some basic math and formulas to calculate historical ratios based off of the data we just pulled in. For example, we'll want to know how Revenue has grown over past years in order to predict how it will grow in the future.

To calculate Revenue growth, we'll want to take the chosen year divided by the previous year minus one. Because this ratio takes into account the previous year to measure growth, we'll start in 2010 and leave 2009 blank.

In cell E8, type the following formula to pull in AAPL's revenue growth from 2009 to 2010:

=E7/D7-1

You can click the % button in the top ribbon bar to make this a percentage, and click and drag this cell across to J8 to populate the rest of the revenue growth numbers.

 

To calculate % EBIT Margin, we'll want to take the 2009 EBIT and divide it by the 2009 Total Revenues.

In cell D10, type the following formula to pull in AAPL's % EBIT Margin for 2009:

=D9/D7

You can click the % button in the top ribbon bar to make this a percentage, and click and drag this cell across to J10 to populate the rest of the % EBIT Margin numbers.

 

To calculate CAPEX/Revenue, we'll want to take the 2009 CAPEX and divide it by the 2009 Total Revenues.

In cell D12, type the following formula to pull in AAPL's CAPEX/Revenue for 2009:

=D11/D7

You can click the % button in the top ribbon bar to make this a percentage, and click and drag this cell across to J12 to populate the rest of the CAPEX/Revenue numbers.

 

To calculate Depreciation/Revenue, we'll want to take the 2009 Depreciation and divide it by the 2009 Total Revenues.

In cell D14, type the following formula to pull in AAPL's Depreciation/Revenue for 2009:

=D13/D7

You can click the % button in the top ribbon bar to make this a percentage, and click and drag this cell across to J14 to populate the rest of the Depreciation/Revenue numbers.

 

To calculate NWC/Revenue, we'll want to take the 2009 NWC and divide it by the 2009 Total Revenues.

In cell D16, type the following formula to pull in AAPL's NWC/Revenue for 2009:

=D15/D7

You can click the % button in the top ribbon bar to make this a percentage, and click and drag this cell across to J16 to populate the rest of the Depreciation/Revenue numbers.

 

To calculate the change in NWC, we'll want to take the 2010 NWC and subtract the 2009 NWC (since this is a growth number we'll leave 2009 blank and start in 2010).

In cell E17, type the following formula to pull in AAPL's change in NWC for between 2009 and 2010:

=E15-D15

You can click and drag this cell across to J17 to populate the rest of the change in NWC numbers.

 

So far, your DCF workbook should look something like this:

Intrinio DCF Valuation Case Study Ratio Projections

 

Forecasted Values

Next, we want to pull in our forecasts for Revenue, EBIT, CAPEX, Depreciation, and NWC for 2016 and 2017.

To forecast Total Revenues, we'll use the Intrinio formula for Wall Street consensus Revenues. We get this data from a company called Zacks, which sources it from top Wall Street analysts. We'll want to divide this value by 1,000,000 to adjust the raw data.

In cell K7, type the following formula to pull in our forecast for AAPL's revenue in 2016:

=IntrinioDataPoint(ticker,"current_yr_ave_revenue_est")/1000000

In cell L7, type the following formula to pull in our forecast for AAPL's revenue in 2017:

=IntrinioDataPoint(ticker,"next_yr_ave_revenue_est")/1000000

 

To project % Revenue Growth in 2016, we'll want to take the Revenue forecast for 2016 and divide by Revenues in 2015 minus 1.

In cell K8, type the following formula to project % Revenue Growth for AAPL in 2016:

=K7/J7-1

You can click and drag this cell across to L8 to project % Revenue Growth for AAPL in 2017.

 

To forecast EBIT in 2016, we need to first know the % EBIT Margin for 2016. To calculate this, we'll take the average of all the historical data for % EBIT Margin.

In cell K10, type the following formula to forecast AAPL's % EBIT Margin for 2016:

=AVERAGE(D10:J10)

You can click and drag this formula across to cell L10 to forecast AAPL's % EBIT Margin for 2017.

 

Moving back up a line to EBIT in 2016, we can now forecast this by multiplying Revenues in 2016 by % EBIT Margin in 2016.

In cell K9, type the following formula to forecast AAPL's EBIT in 2016:

=K10*K7

You can click and drag this formula across to cell L9 to forecast AAPL's EBIT for 2017.

 

Similarly, to calculate CAPEX in 2016 we'll need to first calculate CAPEX/Revenue for 2016. We do this by taking the average of all the historical data for CAPEX/Revenue.

In cell K12, type the following formula to forecast AAPL's CAPEX/Revenue for 2016:

=AVERAGE(D12:J12)

You can click and drag this formula across to cell L12 to forecast AAPL's CAPEX/Revenue for 2017.

 

Moving back up a line to CAPEX in 2016, we can now forecast this by multiplying Revenues in 2016 by CAPEX/Revenue in 2016.

In cell K11, type the following formula to forecast AAPL's CAPEX in 2016:

=K12*K7

You can click and drag this formula across to cell L11 to forecast AAPL's CAPEX for 2017.

 

The same goes for Depreciation: we must first calculate Depreciation/Revenue for 2016.

In cell K14, type the following formula to forecast AAPL's Depreciation/Revenue for 2016:

=AVERAGE(D14:J14)

You can click and drag this formula across to cell L14 to forecast AAPL's Depreciation/Revenue for 2017.

 

Moving back up a line to Depreciation in 2016, we can now forecast this by multiplying Revenues in 2016 by Depreciation/Revenue in 2016.

In cell K13, type the following formula to forecast AAPL's Depreciation in 2016:

=K14*K7

You can click and drag this formula across to cell L13 to forecast AAPL's Depreciation for 2017.

 

Surprise, in order to calculate NWC for 2016 we must first calculate NWC/Revenue in 2016.

In cell K16, type the following formula to forecast AAPL's NWC/Revenue for 2016:

=AVERAGE(H16:J16)

In this case, we only take the average of the past three years instead of averaging all of the historical data. We do this because NWC/Revenue in years 2009-2012 is substantially higher than the rest of the years (outliers) and that doesn't fit into a normalized projection for the future - so we don't want to include it in our calculation of the average.

You can click and drag this formula across to cell L16 to forecast AAPL's NWC/Revenue for 2017.

 

Finally, we can calculate NWC for 2016 by multiplying Revenues in 2016 by NWC/Revenue in 2016.

In cell K15, type the following formula to forecast AAPL's NWC in 2016:

=K16*K7

You can click and drag this formula across to cell L15 to forecast AAPL's NWC for 2017.

 

To finish off our projections, we'll project the change in NWC from 2016 to 2017. We do this by subtracting the actual historical value for NWC in 2015 from our projected value for NWC in 2016.

In cell K17, type the following formula to forecast AAPL's change in NWC:

=K15-J15

You can click and drag this formula across to cell L17 to forecast AAPL's change in NWC from 2016 to 2017.

 

Your projections for the DCF should now look something like this:

Intrinio DCF Valuation Case Excel Projections

Weighted Average Cost of Capital

At this point in the model, we're going to switch over to the WACC worksheet and calculate the weighted average cost of capital before we finish this DCF.

Setup

In your WACC worksheet, type the following to get set up:

  • "DEBT" into cell D4
  • "EQUITY" into cell J4
  • "WACC" into cell D11

Cost of Debt

Underneath "Debt", type the following into cells D5-D7:

  • Moody's AAA Yield
  • Tax Rate
  • After Tax Cost of Debt

In cell E5, we'll use the Intrinio formula that pulls in Moody's AAA Yield from the Federal Reserve. This percentage represents the riskiness of investment grade corporate bonds. In the case of AAPL we'll use the AAA curve because it represents the highest rated corporates yield to maturity, and AAPL carries a lot of cash and is unlikely to go bankrupt. However, depending on the riskiness of the company you have chosen, you can also pull in the BBB curve.

In cell E5 type the following formula to pull in Moody's AAA Yield:

=IntrinioDataPoint("FRED.AAA","value")/100

We divide by 100 to transform the return value into a percentage.

In cell E6 type the following formula to pull in the Tax Rate:

=IntrinioDataPoint(ticker,"efftaxrate")

To calculate the after-tax cost of debt, we need to take the AAA Yield times (1-tax rate).

In cell E7, to calculate the After-Tax Cost of Debt, type in the following formula:

=E5*(1-E6)

 We calculate the cost of debt "after" taxes, because interest expense is tax deductive and dividends paid is not. This means there is a tax advantage to taking out debt.

Your Cost of Debt section should look something like this:

Intrinio DCF Valuation Case Study WACC Cost of Debt

 

Cost of Equity

Underneath "Equity", type the following into cells J5-J8:

  • Risk Free Rate
  • Beta
  • Equity Risk Premium
  • Cost of Equity

In cell K5, we'll use the Intrinio formula to pull in the risk free rate from the Federal Reserve:

This is the 10-year treasury constant maturity

=IntrinioDataPoint("FRED.DGS10","value")/100

In cell K6, type the following formula to pull in the Beta for AAPL:

=IntrinioDataPoint(ticker,"beta")

To calculate the Equity Risk Premium, we use data from Aswath Damodaran a finance professor at the Stern School of Business at New York University. At Intrinio, we call him the Godfather of Value Investing. He is a recognized authoritative source for equity risk premium data.

In cell K7, type in the following formula to pull in Professor Damodaran's ERP value:

=IntrinioDataPoint("DMD.ERP","ttm_erp")

Lastly to calculate the Cost of Equity, we'll take the Risk Free Rate plus (Beta times the Equity Risk Premium).

In cell K8, type in the following formula to pull in the Cost of Equity:

=K5+(K6*K7)

Your Cost of Equity Section should look something like this:

Intrinio DCF Valuation Case Study WACC Cost of Equity

 

WACC

Underneath "WACC", type the following into cells D12-D14:

  • Debt
  • Equity
  • Total Market Value

In cell E12, type the following formula to pull in AAPL's Total Debt:

=IntrinioDataPoint(ticker,"debt")/1000000

In cell E13, type the following formula to pull in AAPL's Total Equity:

=IntrinioDataPoint(ticker,"marketcap")/1000000

In cell E14, type the following formula to calculate AAPL's Total Market Value:

=SUM(E12:E13)

In cell F12, next to the value of debt, we want to calculate debt as a percentage of the total market value.

In cell F12, type the following formula to calculate AAPL's Debt as a percentage of Total Market Value:

=E12/$E$14

In cell F13, next to the value of equity, we want to calculate equity as a percentage of the total market value.

In cell F13, type the following formula to calculate AAPL's Equity as a percentage of Total Market Value:

=E13/$E$14

In cell G12, next to the debt as a percentage of total market value, type the following formula to pull in the after tax cost of debt that we previously calculated above:

=E7

In cell G13, next to the equity as a percentage of total market value, type the following formula to pull in the cost of equity that we previously calculated above:

=K8

In cell H12, type in the following formula to calculate the weighted cost of debt:

=F12*G12

In cell H13, type in the following formula to calculate the weighted cost of equity:

=F13*G13

Lastly, in cell H14, type in the following formula to add the two together and calculate the Weighted Average Cost of Capital:

=SUM(H12:H13)

Your WACC worksheet should now look something like this:

Intrinio DCF Valuation Case Study WACC

Free Cash Flow to Firm

Now that we have calculated the WACC for AAPL, we can head back to the DCF page to finish off the Free Cash flows, discount them, and arrive at an intrinsic value.

Back in the DCF worksheet, we need to calculate the historical FCFF (Free Cash Flow to Firm) for years 2009-2015.

The formula to calculate FCFF is the following:

EBIT * (1-Tax Rate) - CAPEX + Depreciation - Change in NWC

In cell E19, type in the following formula to pull in the FCFF for AAPL for 2009:

=E9*(1-IntrinioFinancials(ticker,"calculations",E4,E5,"efftaxrate"))-E11+E13-E17

You can click and drag this formula across to cell J19 to calculate FCFF for the remaining historical years.

 

To calculate the projected FCFF, we'll use the effective tax rate from the WACC calculation for consistency, since there is no projected tax rate.

In cell K19, type in the following formula to pull in the projected FCFF to AAPL for 2016:

=K9*(1-WACC!$E$6)-K11+K13-K17

The "WACC!$E$6" populates when you reference the effective tax rate from the WACC workbook (cell reference).

You can click and drag this formula across to cell L19 to project FCFF for AAPL for 2017.

Your DCF Worksheet should now look something like this:

Intrinio DCF Valuation Case Study FCFF

 

Discounting Free Cash Flows

The next step after calculating Free Cash Flows is to Discount those Free Cash Flows to their present value. To do this, we need to calculate the discount rate. We'll need to calculate the time periods for the future cash flow as well as the terminal value (FCFF into perpetuity).

In cells J20-J22, type in the following:

  • Periods
  • Terminal Value
  • Discount Factor

In cell K20, type the following formula to calculate the period value for 2016:

=(K3-NOW())/365

You can click this cell and drag across to cell L20 to calculate the period value for 2017.

Leaving cell K22 blank, we'll calculate the Terminal Value in cell L22.

The formula for Terminal Value is the following:

Last Period FCFF / (WACC - long term growth rate)

In cell L22, type in the following formula to calculate the Terminal Value for AAPL:

=L19/(WACC!H14-0.02)

WACC!H14 is a cell reference to the WACC value calculated on the WACC workbook.

We use 0.02 as a long term growth rate because economist consensus for long term nominal GDP growth is around 2-3%.

Next we want to calculate the discount factor.

The formula for discount factor is:

(1-r) ^ t

r = rate and t = time periods

In cell K22 type the following formula to calculate the discount factor for 2016:

=(1-WACC!H14)^DCF!K21

You can click and drag this cell across to L22 to calculate the discount factor for 2017.

Next, to calculate the Discounted Free Cash Flow to Firm we want to multiply the Free Cash Flow for each projected year by the associated Discount Rate.

In cell K25, type the following formula to calculate the DFCFF for AAPL for 2016:

=K19*K22

In cell L25, type the following formula to calculate the DFCFF for AAPL for 2017:

=L21*L22

The Discounted FCFF section of your DCF worksheet should now look like this:

Intrinio DCF Valuation Case Study Discounted FCFF

Calculating Intrinsic Value

Now that we've discounted our cash flows, we're ready to use them to calculate the intrinsic value of AAPL.

In cells J27-J29, type the following:

  • Intrinsic Value of the Firm
  • Total Debt
  • Intrinsic Value of Equity

Next, skipping a row each time, in cells J31, J33, J35 and J37, type the following:

  • Weighted Average Shares Outstanding
  • Intrinsic Value Per Share
  • Last Stock Price
  • Expected Return

Intrinsic Value of The Firm is calculated by simply adding the Discounted FCFF for the projected years together.

In cell K27, type the following to calculate AAPL's Intrinsic Value of The Firm:

=SUM(K25:L25)

In cell K28, type in the following formula to pull in AAPL's Total Debt:

=IntrinioDataPoint(ticker,"debt")/1000000

In cell K29, type in the following formula to calculate AAPL's Intrinsic Value of Equity:

=K27-K28

In cell K31, type in the following formula to pull in AAPL's Weighted Average Shares Outstanding:

=IntrinioDataPoint(ticker,"weightedavedilutedsharesos")/1000000

To calculate the intrinsic value per share, we simply take the intrinsic value of equity divided by the weighted average shares outstanding.

In cell K33, type in the following formula to calculate AAPL's intrinsic value per share:

=K29/K31

In cell K31, type in the following formula to pull in AAPL's Last Stock Price:

=IntrinioDataPoint(ticker,"close_price")

Lastly, to calculate our expected return, we want to take the intrinsic value per share divided by the last stock price minus one.

In cell K37, type in the following formula to calculate the expected return for AAPL:

=K33/K35-1

The intrinsic value section of your DCF workbook should look like this:

Intrinio Valuation Case Study DCF Intrinsic Value

Congratulations, you're done! We've just created a comprehensive discounted cash flow valuation for AAPL, calculating an intrinsic value of $165.52 and an expected return of 53.22%. Obviously, this entire exercise is based on a set of assumptions. Feel free to play around with the model, change some assumptions, and see how it affects the calculated value of the company.

For the students at USF, and hopefully for you too - this has been:

  • A valuable exercise in how valuation works

  • A valuable lesson in Excel functionality

  • A powerful exhibition of the capabilities of the Intrinio Financial Data Feed and Excel add-in

In the end, the DCF workbook should look something like this:

Intrinio Valuation Case Study DCF

If you are a student or professor interested in Intrinio Financial Data or have questions about this Quant Model exercise, please click the green chat button in the right hand corner of this website. We promise to get back to you within the hour.

 

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Generally speaing, 1 API Call is equivalent to pulling in one piece of data from our database into Excel or Google Sheets. However, there are a few exceptions - including pulling in entire financial statments, and pulling in all price history for one company.

Check out the infographic below to learn what an API Call is.

Intrinio API Call Infographic

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