Sector & Industry Data Joins the Squad

Intrinio Now Offers Aggregated Sector & Industry Data

We've unleashed the power of aggregating industry statistics so that you can efficiently perform top down analysis.

This data is based on company reported Standard Industrial Classification numbers. 

These indices are updated monthly, reflecting all newly reported filings. 

 

An Intrinio SIC Index is created with the following format: $SIC.XXXX.

Example: $SIC.1380

-> returns aggregated industry statistics for the Oil & Gas Field Services

Read More

3 Ways To Access the Most Affordable Financial Data on the Market

 

WELCOME TO #DATAFREED NOT #DATAFEED

Get started for free today by visiting www.intrinio.com. Register with your email, visit our pricing page, and check out our documentation or Youtube videos for help getting started.

We're always available via 24/7 chat on our website – just click the green button in the bottom right hand corner of the page for support. 

Follow us on Twitter and LinkedIn and Like us on Facebook to stay up to date.

Historical Data: We Gave Data Point a Makeover

Historical Data: Query any data point as a historical time series.

The same data points, but now with functionality that lets you slice and dice the information historically.

Now, in addition to analyzing our wealth of financial data, you can analyze historical time series data to uncover trends, analyze patterns, chart, graph and display historical data, and project the future.

Combined with the rest of our data offering (stock prices, fundamentals, metrics, ratios, earnings estimates, news, economic data etc.) -> Intrinio users have comprehensive access to the information they need to make informed, intelligent investment decisions - without breaking the bank.

Read More

Economic Data Added to Intrinio API

We're pleased to announce that Intrinio now offers full access to over 200,000 Economic Data Series through our API, Excel add-in and Google Sheets add-on

1,000 of the most popular series are listed for you in our documentation.

The full list of 200,000 different series is available on the Federal Reserve Economic Data Website.

 

Now, in addition to analyzing our wealth of financial data, you can analyze thousands of economic data points to help you understand the economy on different levels.

You can now use Intrinio to pull in economic data to compare a company’s performance to various measures of growth or production.  For example, you can see that mining equipment purchases are down, which means production growth may stall in the future years.  To understand that correlation, you might build statistical analyses based on historical data for the company relative to the historical economic data.

Combined with the rest of our data offering (stock prices, fundamentals, metrics, ratios, earnings estimates, news, etc.) -> Intrinio users have comprehensive access to the information they need to make informed, intelligent investment decisions - without breaking the bank.

Each time we add new data sets to our data feed there is no additional charge. This means that as we grow and continue to annouce new offerings, the value of your access increases continually. We strive to provide you with a wealth of knowledge, data and insight.

Example Economic Data Series

  • Gross Domestic Product
  • Velocity of M2 Money Stock
  • Civilian Unemployment Rate
  • Effective Federal Funds Rate
  • U.S./EURO Foreign Exchange Rate
  • University of Michigan: Consumer Sentiment
  • BofA Merrill Lynch US Corporate BBB Effective Yield
  • Gold Fixing Price 10:30 A.M. (London time) in London Bullion Market, based in U.S. Dollars
  • Real Retail and Food Services Sales
  • AND 199,991 MORE.......

Functionality

The index symbol is the same as the Series ID on FRED, but you put a "$" before the Series ID for our API to recognize it.

For equity data, we call the company like this -> "AAPL"

For Federal Reserve Economic Data Series, we call the series like this -> "$GDPC96"

(this returns Real Gross Domestic Product, 3 Decimal)

Below is an example of the return values when you use the API to query historical quarterly GDP.

Intrinio API Economic Data Series return values in the browser

Remember, you can search for the 1,000 most popular Series IDs in our documentation, or search through the full 200,000 on the Federal Reserve Economic Data website.

 

Enjoy our new Economic Data feature! If you have questions, comments or suggestions, please reach out to our support team by clicking the green button in the bottom right hand corner of your screen at intrinio.com

Happy 2016!!!

 

WELCOME TO #DATAFREED NOT #DATAFEED

Get started for free today by visiting www.intrinio.com. Register with your email, visit our pricing page, and check out our documentation or Youtube videos for help getting started.

We're always available via 24/7 chat on our website - just click the green button in the bottom right hand corner of the page for support. 

Follow us on Twitter and LinkedIn and Like us on Facebook to stay up to date.

Stock News Feed Added to Intrinio API

Introducing: Stock News

Intrinio now enables its users to pull in stock news on the companies they follow.

By entering in one simple formula, our users can return the most recent news stories for every company in our coverage (any US publicly traded company).

This exciting expansion of our data set enables you to stay up to date with trending topics and key events that are crucial to your investments, your portfolio, your app, your website, your blog or your customers.

Check out the full documentation to learn more.

Combined with the rest of our data offering (stock prices, fundamentals, metrics, ratios, earnings estimates, economic data, etc.) -> Intrinio users have comprehensive access to the information they need to make informed, intelligent investment decisions - without breaking the bank.

Each time we add new data sets to our data feed there is no additional charge. This means that as we grow and continue to annouce new offerings, the value of your access increases continually. We strive to provide you with a wealth of knowledge, data and insight.

Parameters

  • ticker – the stock market ticker symbol associated with the company's common stock.  If the company is foreign, use the stock exchange code, followed by a colon, then the ticker.

Return Values

  • title – the title of the article
  • publication_date – the date the article was published
  • url – the hyperlink to the article
  • summary – a brief summary of the article

Example

Below is an example request you can make to the Intrinio API to return the most recent news stories for Apple, Inc. (AAPL).

Intrinio API: /news returns the most recent news stories for a company.

API URI: https://www.intrinio.com/api
GET: /news?ticker=AAPL
FULL URL: https://www.intrinio.com/api/news?ticker=AAPL

The image below shows the API request above and the values that are returned:

Intrinio API Stock News Return Value in the Browser

Below is an example request you can make in Excel using the Intrinio Excel add-in or in Google Sheets using the Intrinio add-on to return the most recent news stories for Apple, Inc. (AAPL).

=IntrinioNews(ticker,item,sequence)

Item: Title, URL, publication_date, summary

Sequence: The number of the article from the list

=IntrinioNews("AAPL","summary",4)

Returning Multiple Companies

Using the API, you can query stock news data for up to 10 tickers at one time, separating each with a comma.

Using the API:

FULL URL: https://www.intrinio.com/api/news?ticker=AAPL,AMZN

Using Excel or Google Sheets:
=IntrinioNews("AAPL,AMZN","title",0)

Remember, full documentation is available here!

 

Enjoy our new News feature! If you have questions, comments or suggestions, please reach out to our support team by clicking the green button in the bottom right hand corner at intrinio.com

Happy 2016!!!

 

WELCOME TO #DATAFREED NOT #DATAFEED

Get started for free today by visiting www.intrinio.com. Register with your email, visit our pricing page, and check out our documentation or Youtube videos for help getting started.

We're always available via 24/7 chat on our website - just click the green button in the bottom right hand corner of the page for support. 

Follow us on Twitter and LinkedIn and Like us on Facebook to stay up to date.

Weekly Valuation Feature: Can Ford Make the Transition to Vehicles as a Service (VAS)?

Each week, we'll be featuring a Report from Valuation on our Blog.

What is Valuation?

Valuation is an innovative engine online built for valuing public comapnies – and it's free. Our Users can simply type in a ticker and they'll instantly see a "default" intrinsic value for the stock. The platform is flexible, allowing you to easily click and drag your assumptions and the main drivers of the model up and down. The engine is perfect for scenario and sensitivity testing, helping you to quickly gauge whether a company is over or undervalued. You can save all of your Valuations. Currently, Valuation is structured around the Discounted Cash Flow method. Stay tuned, because we're going to be building out additional methodology and features soon.

valuation

What is a Report?

We've built a collaborative platform called Exchange. It's the only platform for exchanging investment analyses that is both qualitative and quantitiative, requiring the actual numbers to back up your conclusions. Users can "Create a Report" and choose one of their Valuations to associate it with. They can then add a written, qualitative analysis to accompany their quantitative valuation, and attach any additional files that they want. These Reports are posted to our Exchange where our users can comment, discuss, and collaborate. Visit Exchange to acquire Reports and add them to your "Library"

Report

This Week's Feature: "Can Ford Make the Transition to Vehicles as a Service (VAS)?"

Submitted by: Andrew Carpenter

I've owned Ford in a retirement account for some time. Next month it looks like Ford will announce its traditional dividend increase as well as a driverless car partnership with Google. That made me want to consider getting some of my taxable portfolio behind the stock. The lack of a recent big downturn for Ford makes me cautious about the company's ability to create a big ROI. I doubled down on IBM and STX instead. My biggest concern with Ford is that I suspect, in the long run, driverless cars will decrease the demand for cars overall.

Beta: Ford has a nice low beta of 1.17. This lack of variability reminds me of Ford's ability to not take a bailout back in the great recession- this is a company that knows about stability and I think that contributes to their brand but hinders their ability to adapt.

Dividend: At over 4% with enough free cash flow to cover payouts and an expected hike in January, Ford is a tempting dividend river to add to feed into my dividend cannon. I think of my monthly dividends as an income stream I can point at things- usually I point them at stocks but someday I want to point them at my expenses to cover my writing habit. Ford certainly qualifies for my ideal range of 3%-6%.

Price: Ford traded about 7% lower than its current price in August and later in September however it has fallen about 14% from its yearly highs in October and last spring. Forgive the roughness of these estimates, I'm really just trying to determine if any surprises have been priced in. Based on its middle of the road price for the year I wouldn't qualify this as an opportunistic time to buy.

P/E ratio: For has a P/E ratio of about 11.72 which makes sense for an old time company in such a competitive industry. I like that multiple, but I don't love it. See my insight into the future of the industry below.

Valuation: The base case valuation for Ford based on Wall Street consensus estimates shows a huge margin of safety score of 71 with an intrinsic value of $48.18. This is one case where I won't trust the algorithmic DCF that Intrinio so kindly calculates for me to make my job easier but it does provide some insight into the fundamentals of Ford- this is a strong company with a healthy balance sheet.

Insight: Here is where my concern with Ford is preventing me from investing more. Imagine the world that Ford's CEO predicted- driverless cars in 5 years. With Google (hopefully) throwing its brains behind Ford, it seems like they will get a jump on that dream. But what will this mean? Someone, maybe Ford, will win the race for government approval. That will be a huge moment for that company and if I had to pick a horse I don't see why Ford, with its strong cash flows to invest, shouldn't win, especially if it partners with Google. In that best case scenario, what would happen for Ford? It would be an initial boom- everyone who could get one would want one, and those babies would actually be worth putting up some serious cash for. 

But then what? Here is my prediction- cars will become like apartments. People with cash will buy them as assets, not liabilities, and will rent them out by the hour. Companies like Uber will become the norm as cars become an operating expense, rather than a capital expense, for most people. In general, this will mean a lot fewer cars will be sold because cars will not be sitting idol. When you aren't driving it, someone else is renting it from you. You've heard as software as a service- can Ford make that transition as well?

Maybe yes, maybe no, but the industry is about to be disrupted in a big way. That creates a lot of opportunity but also a lot of risk. I don't buy automakers because I'm looking for big risks, I'd rather save some cash for a down payment on a driverless car I can rent out. 

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

About my strategy:

I use Intrinio’s excel add in to keep a watch list of companies- it’s a great tool because it is free for the amount of data I use and I can set the fields up exactly how I need them. Email me at acarpenter@intrinio.com and I’ll send you my template or answer your questions about the Excel add-in, you can also see it attached to each of my reports.

In that watch list I look at the following metrics:

Price: Has the stock dropped significantly (10% or more) or is the company near its 52 week low (within 10%). If so, I take this as evidence that the stock is a contrarian buy- others are bearish so I want to be bullish. The drop in price is assumed to indicate at least some negative factors are priced in, providing some margin of safety.

P/E Ratio: With the full knowledge that interpreting P/E ratios is far more complicated than simply saying lower is better, I’m looking for companies in the sweet spot between 8-14. This means the company is stable but under valued as compared to historic averages for the broader market which fluctuates between 15-22. I consider getting more earnings for a lower price to be a mark of value and as a value investor, I’m looking for stocks in this range.

Beta: Price fluctuations can be an opportunity for traders and market timers but I would rather see slow, steady growth over time. That said, I’m looking for growth and with growth comes some volatility. I’m looking for betas under 2 with betas under 1 being a big plus.

Dividend: I understand the argument for a company reinvesting in itself instead of paying money to its shareholders. Still, a dividend that has grown overtime is a sign that a company can build its asset base and provide cash to investors. That is a good sign and it is something that gives me the confidence that if I am wrong about a stock I can get paid to hold onto it until it rebounds. Someday I’d like to use my dividends as an income stream and as I find great values I plan to hold them for years or decades for this purpose. I consider 3%-6% to be the ideal balance between repaying shareholders and reinvesting in future growth.

Valuation: With the help of Intrinio’s online valuation engine I will check my assumptions against the DCF intrinsic value of the company to determine if it is the right buy at the right time.  

Insight: When I find a stock whose business model I like, I add it to my watch list and, when I have capital to invest, I look for stocks on my list that fit the criteria listed above. If I find one, I will generate a report on it that includes these factors as well as my personal insight into the future of the company. 

 

- See more at: https://www.intrinio.com/app#/report/41

 

I've owned Ford in a retirement account for some time. Next month it looks like Ford will announce its traditional dividend increase as well as a driverless car partnership with Google. That made me want to consider getting some of my taxable portfolio behind the stock. The lack of a recent big downturn for Ford makes me cautious about the company's ability to create a big ROI. I doubled down on IBM and STX instead. My biggest concern with Ford is that I suspect, in the long run, driverless cars will decrease the demand for cars overall.

Beta: Ford has a nice low beta of 1.17. This lack of variability reminds me of Ford's ability to not take a bailout back in the great recession- this is a company that knows about stability and I think that contributes to their brand but hinders their ability to adapt.

Dividend: At over 4% with enough free cash flow to cover payouts and an expected hike in January, Ford is a tempting dividend river to add to feed into my dividend cannon. I think of my monthly dividends as an income stream I can point at things- usually I point them at stocks but someday I want to point them at my expenses to cover my writing habit. Ford certainly qualifies for my ideal range of 3%-6%.

Price: Ford traded about 7% lower than its current price in August and later in September however it has fallen about 14% from its yearly highs in October and last spring. Forgive the roughness of these estimates, I'm really just trying to determine if any surprises have been priced in. Based on its middle of the road price for the year I wouldn't qualify this as an opportunistic time to buy.

P/E ratio: For has a P/E ratio of about 11.72 which makes sense for an old time company in such a competitive industry. I like that multiple, but I don't love it. See my insight into the future of the industry below.

Valuation: The base case valuation for Ford based on Wall Street consensus estimates shows a huge margin of safety score of 71 with an intrinsic value of $48.18. This is one case where I won't trust the algorithmic DCF that Intrinio so kindly calculates for me to make my job easier but it does provide some insight into the fundamentals of Ford- this is a strong company with a healthy balance sheet.

Insight: Here is where my concern with Ford is preventing me from investing more. Imagine the world that Ford's CEO predicted- driverless cars in 5 years. With Google (hopefully) throwing its brains behind Ford, it seems like they will get a jump on that dream. But what will this mean? Someone, maybe Ford, will win the race for government approval. That will be a huge moment for that company and if I had to pick a horse I don't see why Ford, with its strong cash flows to invest, shouldn't win, especially if it partners with Google. In that best case scenario, what would happen for Ford? It would be an initial boom- everyone who could get one would want one, and those babies would actually be worth putting up some serious cash for. 

But then what? Here is my prediction- cars will become like apartments. People with cash will buy them as assets, not liabilities, and will rent them out by the hour. Companies like Uber will become the norm as cars become an operating expense, rather than a capital expense, for most people. In general, this will mean a lot fewer cars will be sold because cars will not be sitting idol. When you aren't driving it, someone else is renting it from you. You've heard as software as a service- can Ford make that transition as well?

Maybe yes, maybe no, but the industry is about to be disrupted in a big way. That creates a lot of opportunity but also a lot of risk. I don't buy automakers because I'm looking for big risks, I'd rather save some cash for a down payment on a driverless car I can rent out. 

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

About my strategy:

I use Intrinio’s excel add in to keep a watch list of companies- it’s a great tool because it is free for the amount of data I use and I can set the fields up exactly how I need them. Email me at acarpenter@intrinio.com and I’ll send you my template or answer your questions about the Excel add-in, you can also see it attached to each of my reports.

In that watch list I look at the following metrics:

Price- Has the stock dropped significantly (10% or more) or is the company near its 52 week low (within 10%). If so, I take this as evidence that the stock is a contrarian buy- others are bearish so I want to be bullish. The drop in price is assumed to indicate at least some negative factors are priced in, providing some margin of safety.

P/E Ratio- With the full knowledge that interpreting P/E ratios is far more complicated than simply saying lower is better, I’m looking for companies in the sweet spot between 8-14. This means the company is stable but under valued as compared to historic averages for the broader market which fluctuates between 15-22. I consider getting more earnings for a lower price to be a mark of value and as a value investor, I’m looking for stocks in this range.

Beta- Price fluctuations can be an opportunity for traders and market timers but I would rather see slow, steady growth over time. That said, I’m looking for growth and with growth comes some volatility. I’m looking for betas under 2 with betas under 1 being a big plus.

Dividend- I understand the argument for a company reinvesting in itself instead of paying money to its shareholders. Still, a dividend that has grown overtime is a sign that a company can build its asset base and provide cash to investors. That is a good sign and it is something that gives me the confidence that if I am wrong about a stock I can get paid to hold onto it until it rebounds. Someday I’d like to use my dividends as an income stream and as I find great values I plan to hold them for years or decades for this purpose. I consider 3%-6% to be the ideal balance between repaying shareholders and reinvesting in future growth.

Valuation: With the help of Intrinio’s online valuation engine I will check my assumptions against the DCF intrinsic value of the company to determine if it is the right buy at the right time.  

Insight: When I find a stock whose business model I like, I add it to my watch list and, when I have capital to invest, I look for stocks on my list that fit the criteria listed above. If I find one, I will generate a report on it that includes these factors as well as my personal insight into the future of the company. 

 

- See more at: https://www.intrinio.com/app#/report/41

I've owned Ford in a retirement account for some time. Next month it looks like Ford will announce its traditional dividend increase as well as a driverless car partnership with Google. That made me want to consider getting some of my taxable portfolio behind the stock. The lack of a recent big downturn for Ford makes me cautious about the company's ability to create a big ROI. I doubled down on IBM and STX instead. My biggest concern with Ford is that I suspect, in the long run, driverless cars will decrease the demand for cars overall.

Beta: Ford has a nice low beta of 1.17. This lack of variability reminds me of Ford's ability to not take a bailout back in the great recession- this is a company that knows about stability and I think that contributes to their brand but hinders their ability to adapt.

Dividend: At over 4% with enough free cash flow to cover payouts and an expected hike in January, Ford is a tempting dividend river to add to feed into my dividend cannon. I think of my monthly dividends as an income stream I can point at things- usually I point them at stocks but someday I want to point them at my expenses to cover my writing habit. Ford certainly qualifies for my ideal range of 3%-6%.

Price: Ford traded about 7% lower than its current price in August and later in September however it has fallen about 14% from its yearly highs in October and last spring. Forgive the roughness of these estimates, I'm really just trying to determine if any surprises have been priced in. Based on its middle of the road price for the year I wouldn't qualify this as an opportunistic time to buy.

P/E ratio: For has a P/E ratio of about 11.72 which makes sense for an old time company in such a competitive industry. I like that multiple, but I don't love it. See my insight into the future of the industry below.

Valuation: The base case valuation for Ford based on Wall Street consensus estimates shows a huge margin of safety score of 71 with an intrinsic value of $48.18. This is one case where I won't trust the algorithmic DCF that Intrinio so kindly calculates for me to make my job easier but it does provide some insight into the fundamentals of Ford- this is a strong company with a healthy balance sheet.

Insight: Here is where my concern with Ford is preventing me from investing more. Imagine the world that Ford's CEO predicted- driverless cars in 5 years. With Google (hopefully) throwing its brains behind Ford, it seems like they will get a jump on that dream. But what will this mean? Someone, maybe Ford, will win the race for government approval. That will be a huge moment for that company and if I had to pick a horse I don't see why Ford, with its strong cash flows to invest, shouldn't win, especially if it partners with Google. In that best case scenario, what would happen for Ford? It would be an initial boom- everyone who could get one would want one, and those babies would actually be worth putting up some serious cash for. 

But then what? Here is my prediction- cars will become like apartments. People with cash will buy them as assets, not liabilities, and will rent them out by the hour. Companies like Uber will become the norm as cars become an operating expense, rather than a capital expense, for most people. In general, this will mean a lot fewer cars will be sold because cars will not be sitting idol. When you aren't driving it, someone else is renting it from you. You've heard as software as a service- can Ford make that transition as well?

Maybe yes, maybe no, but the industry is about to be disrupted in a big way. That creates a lot of opportunity but also a lot of risk. I don't buy automakers because I'm looking for big risks, I'd rather save some cash for a down payment on a driverless car I can rent out. 

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

About my strategy:

I use Intrinio’s excel add in to keep a watch list of companies- it’s a great tool because it is free for the amount of data I use and I can set the fields up exactly how I need them. Email me at acarpenter@intrinio.com and I’ll send you my template or answer your questions about the Excel add-in, you can also see it attached to each of my reports.

In that watch list I look at the following metrics:

Price- Has the stock dropped significantly (10% or more) or is the company near its 52 week low (within 10%). If so, I take this as evidence that the stock is a contrarian buy- others are bearish so I want to be bullish. The drop in price is assumed to indicate at least some negative factors are priced in, providing some margin of safety.

P/E Ratio- With the full knowledge that interpreting P/E ratios is far more complicated than simply saying lower is better, I’m looking for companies in the sweet spot between 8-14. This means the company is stable but under valued as compared to historic averages for the broader market which fluctuates between 15-22. I consider getting more earnings for a lower price to be a mark of value and as a value investor, I’m looking for stocks in this range.

Beta- Price fluctuations can be an opportunity for traders and market timers but I would rather see slow, steady growth over time. That said, I’m looking for growth and with growth comes some volatility. I’m looking for betas under 2 with betas under 1 being a big plus.

Dividend- I understand the argument for a company reinvesting in itself instead of paying money to its shareholders. Still, a dividend that has grown overtime is a sign that a company can build its asset base and provide cash to investors. That is a good sign and it is something that gives me the confidence that if I am wrong about a stock I can get paid to hold onto it until it rebounds. Someday I’d like to use my dividends as an income stream and as I find great values I plan to hold them for years or decades for this purpose. I consider 3%-6% to be the ideal balance between repaying shareholders and reinvesting in future growth.

Valuation: With the help of Intrinio’s online valuation engine I will check my assumptions against the DCF intrinsic value of the company to determine if it is the right buy at the right time.  

Insight: When I find a stock whose business model I like, I add it to my watch list and, when I have capital to invest, I look for stocks on my list that fit the criteria listed above. If I find one, I will generate a report on it that includes these factors as well as my personal insight into the future of the company. 

 

- See more at: https://www.intrinio.com/app#/report/41

– See more at: https://www.intrinio.com/app#/report/41